Small retrospection

In my previous blog post we talked about shapeless and how it could be applied to enhance how you work with Futures. Even though we were focused on Futures, our goal wasn’t to provide the best and ultimate util to deal with them, but to demonstrate how shapeless can help us build functions that are more flexible than almost everything we are used to work with.

So in last post we have created a kind of varargs function that is able to adjust its return type to the arguments passed in. Today we’ll take it much farther by adding scalaz, ApplicativeBuilder and Monads into the soup. Read more

Futures today

Today, when reactive programming is so popular concept and you can see ‘We’re reactive!’ claim on so many pages that have anything to do with scala (and not only), Futures are something you have to deal all the time. Read more

The Problem

In my previous post we have written a simple app with Scala.js. In the end we managed to do everything we wanted to, but as we added more and more code a problem appeared – state management, the real app killer. Although our app didn’t do anything advanced, state handling and UI updates forced us to write a lot of additional code.

That post has shown that Scala.js allows us to write browser apps, but it also demonstrated that these apps can be vulnerable to other ills of frontend programming. To fix this issue we need to simplify our codebase. One way to do that is by adding a binding between the UI and what data our app holds. This way if the data changes in one place it will be automatically propagated to the other. We will implement this using Reactive Extensions. Read more