Posts

In this post we will discuss Each. Each allows Scala users to write imperative syntax, which is later on translated into scalaz monadic expressions. In a way, it’s adding syntactic sugar on top of ordinary Scala. Simplicity and the way it extends ordinary code caught my attention, so I’ve decided to dig deeper.

This post will answer some basic questions about Each – how to use it, why it works and how to use the same principles in your code. Hopefully, we will demystify Scala macros along the way. Read more

We can all agree that it’s useful to be able to express a number. Or a character. It could be argued that most code is built upon some set of primitives. And naturally simple types work well in a limited number of use cases: algorithms, tutorials, small/focused applications etc.

The moment the domain outgrows the natural usage of a given primitive it becomes troublesome to keep in mind what the meaning behind a particular Int is. We all know this, it’s been the driving force behind OOP since day one.

Recently I’ve been working on an application based on play framework 2.4.x and slick 3.0. Unsurprisingly, as the app grew the need to track and control domain specific data became more and more pressing. Read more

Hello! In this post I’ll describe the process of creating a macro transforming a function. We’ll go through a short introduction to macros and learn how to use them to our advantage. Read more